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Childhood Train
  • Artist: Pamela Mering
  • Label: CD Baby
  • UPC: 634479740503
  • Item #: SRD974050
  • Genre: Rock
  • Release Date: 4/8/2008
  • This product is a special order
  • Rank: 1000000000
CD 
List Price: $19.98
Price: $17.56
You Save: $2.42 (12%)

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Description

Childhood Train on CD

Raised in the neighborhood of Silverlake, an artistic enclave in Los Angeles, Pamela Mering is the youngest of five siblings born to middle aged parents. Pamela's father was a World War II veteran. Wounded in the war, he was an entrepreneur with diverse vocations. Pamela's mother was a schoolteacher who as a young child had been forced into a Vaudeville stage career to support her parents. So at the age of four, Virginia LaFonde was a throat whistler dressed in bird costumes and known as a child wonder for her imitations of birdcalls. Virginia LaFonde's movie debut was "The Gateway of the Moon" starring Walter Pidgeon and Delores Rios. She was also rumored to be in one of the many Charlie Chan films. Pamela Mering's earliest memories of music were of her dancing as a small child in the living room of her family's hilltop home as her mother played a baby grand piano and sang songs from the 1930's and 1940's such as "Hi Lily Hi Low," "Am I Blue?" and "You Made me Love you." The family lived in a cape cod style home located on one of the original properties in Silverlake once owned by the cowboy silent film star, Tom Mix. There was an age spread of eleven years between her closest sibling and eighteen years between herself and her eldest sibling. As a result, Pamela at an early age was exposed to the sophisticated musical taste of her older brothers and sisters. Barely reaching the phonograph to place the needle on the record albums, the artists of choice were Judy Collins, Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Van Morrison and Leon Russell. One of her sisters loved the Beatles, saw them at the Hollywood Bowl and played their records constantly. Another sister took her to the Troubadour to see a young barefoot Linda Ronstadt on stage with the Stone Ponies. Her older brother would play Frank Sinatra and Harry Nilsson. At the age of seven, she acquired a Judy Collins Song book a purchase from Fedco, that became one of her most treasured possessions. She carried it around with her to every play date as her profound object of interest to share with her young friends. She didn't necessarily understand the text of the stories that Judy Collins wrote of her experiences, but the songs provided a refuge. Singing folk songs and listening to music was the great escape from a household that was colorfully eccentric to say the least. And then the cataclysmic moment came. . . . . Pamela heard Joni Mitchell. "I remember loving the song 'Both Sides Now' sung by Judy Collins. Upon discovering that the writer was Joni Mitchell and hearing Joni's album 'Song to a Seagull' and 'Clouds' changed everything for me. I had never heard anyone like her before. Her voice penetrated the deepest part of me and I knew right then and there what I wanted to do more than anything else in life was to be a singer/songwriter." Pamela traveled as a young adult. She hopped trains, backpacked through the Grand Canyon and Yosemite, lived in Boulder, Colorado and Hawaii, attended some college, and participated in theater, while constantly writing songs. After meeting the love of her life, Pamela put her pursuit of a musical career on hold to raise a family but the dream of music was never far from her thoughts. She would continue to explore her musical frontier by writing songs in the midst of her working and family responsibilities. Her compositions hold a sense of melancholy and triumph; they are vignettes of true love, loss and honesty. The culmination of her years of songwriting has lead to her first album "Childhood Train," a long awaited presentation of her life's work. Her music executes a kaleidoscope of sound, melding beautiful harmonies with blues rhythms. Accompanied by her husband Sumner Mering on guitar and vocal, the band creates a mixture of singer-songwriter passion and instrumental prowess. Additional band members are Mark Amentt playing acoustic bass with Tony Del Moore on drums.