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Nutria N.N.
  • Artist: Nutria N.N.
  • Label: CD Baby
  • UPC: 796873003452
  • Item #: SRD300345
  • Genre: Folk
  • Release Date: 12/25/2007
  • This product is a special order
  • Rank: 1000000000
CD 
List Price: $16.98
Price: $15.03
You Save: $1.95 (11%)

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Description

Nutria N.N. on CD

Nutria N.N. (No Name, Nomen Nominandum) is an otter, is a band, is the oldest nickname of Christian Torres-Roje who in the 90's was part of the Chilean experimental trio Maestro. In 2001, after graduating from philosophy school, he moves to Brooklyn to focus on his music education. In 2004 Torres-Roje formally started Nutria N.N. performing in the Lowers East Side and Williambsburgh. Today, and usually helped by architect Pedro Pulido, Nutria N.N. produces a rather odd musical mix: their music is rooted in South American folk but it includes elements of many different cultures, new and old. Inspired by poets such as Pablo Neruda, Federico Garcia-Lorca and Walt Whitman and also by seminal Chilean singer songwriters Victor Jara and Violeta Parra, Nutria N.N. is forging their own voice. They are now promoting their second effort 'Nutria N.N.' which has received good reviews by critics as well as the support of anti-poet Nicanor Parra who became a fan of the band. Other highlights include their appearance in the video 'Homeless lamp' (directed by Chilean visual artist Iván Navarro) and a concert at Exit Art (NYC) sharing the bill with fellow Brooklynites Au Revoir Simone. In January 2007 Nutria N.N.´s second collaboration with long time friend Navarro was reviewed in The New York Times: '[Nutria N.N.] gives an almost exquisite poignancy to the lyrics...' said Roberta Smith, Art in Review, NY Times.