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Palookaville
  • Artist: Moonlight Graham
  • Label: CD Baby
  • UPC: 625989367120
  • Item #: CDBY936712
  • Genre: Rock
  • Release Date: 6/24/2003
  • This product is a special order
  • Rank: 1000000000
CD 
List Price: $14.98
Price: $13.04
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Description

Palookaville on CD

Up to this point in time, Graham has been best known for his lead singer/lyricist/guitarist roles in Canadian band Barstool Prophets, who toured Canada and the northern US in support of one indie release (1993's 'Deflowered') and two major-label releases with Mercury/Polygram (1995's 'Crank' and 1997's 'Last of the Big Game Hunters') through much of the 1990's. 'Paranoia', the second single from 'Crank', was featured in the Alliance/Atlantis major motion picture 'Never Talk to Strangers'(starring Rebecca Demornay and Antonio Banderas) and appeared on the subsequent soundtrack album released on Scotti Bros. Records worldwide in 1996. This helped to spur Crank on to worldwide release as well. After the amicable winding-down of Barstool Prophets, Graham found himself disenchanted with the music business as a whole, and setting aside his true talents, turned to supporting his family by becoming a mechanic's apprentice; working in his brother-in-law's garage and attending college apprenticeship courses in Ottawa,Ontario, Canada. Three-quarters of the way through his 4 years of training, however, he realized that dishonest, self-serving people were not limited in life solely to the 'Music Industry'. Instructors at the school he was attending began teaching the students tips for over-charging future customers (a practice frowned upon by his bro-in-law, by the way). He quickly figured that if he was going to have to deal with such people, he might as well be doing something that he was passionate about and decided to return to his songwriting. Around the same time this revelation was taking place, Graham received a phone call from Joe Hardy (producer of album's by ZZ Top, Tom Cochrane, Steve Earle, Colin James) who had gotten to know Graham while working on the Prophets last album 'Last of the Big Game Hunters'. He was calling with regards to singer/songwriter-style demos Graham had sent to him over a two-year period, wanting to know what plans Graham had for them. Joe encouraged Graham to develop and record the demos and offered to mix them. He basically made Graham an offer he couldn't refuse. The icing on the cake came through an offer from an independent third party to finance Graham's recording venture after hearing him play and sing acoustic versions of his new songs at a house-party. Things were eerily starting to fall in place. Graham had been halfheartedly rehearsing with a new band made up of guitarist Darwin Demers, bassist Garney Paterson, and drummer Todd Huckabone, but until this time had not had much direction or raison d'etre. The strange alignment of circumstance proved to be a strong motivator, and Graham's new band entered Ottawa's Distortion Studios with engineer Tracy Holmes intending to send the 14 songs recorded down to Joe Hardy in Houston, Texas on computer hard-drive to be mixed. But there were many obstacles yet to overcome. Illnesses, equipment failures and scheduling troubles turned the planned 1 month recording session into 4 months of sporadic studio work, with extra overdubs eventually being recorded in drummer Huckabone's Mole Man Studios in Orleans, Ontario. Then, when the hard-drive containing the completed recording finally made it's way down to Joe, a combination of unrelated anomalies made the drive unreadable and two weeks of 'fixing' followed before mixing could commence. Two other towering stumbling-blocks remained: The extra time put into the overall recording process had taken a heavy toll on Graham's funding, AND had effectively closed Joe's window of availability to even do the mixing due to previously-arranged engagements he had to honour. These factors combined to make Graham's planned trip down to Houston to attend mixes impractical, and the plans were subsequently aborted. A contingency plan was quickly proposed by Joe, whereby he would mix the album in his spare time and e-mail mp3 mixes to Graham at his home in Cornwall, Ontario, a song at a time. After receiving all 14 songs, Graham would e-mail back his recommendations/ changes and commence the 1st round of remixes. Four weeks and four rounds of remixing/tweaking followed, with Graham adding/redoing things here and there at Mole Man, and Joe adding some terrific playing to the project at his end. The technology that had crippled the project earlier had now become it's savior and the strange feeling of predetermination prevailed. The fruits of their labours can be heard on Moonlight Graham's debut 'Palookaville'