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For Those We Love
  • Label: CD Baby
  • UPC: 798936600011
  • Item #: CDBY660001
  • Release Date: 12/17/2002
  • This product is a special order
CD 
List Price: $19.98
Price: $17.56
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For Those We Love on CD

An intimate recording of hymns and praise songs arranged and performed by Jim Ho, violin and Gee Lim, piano. Hi, this is Jim. You're probably interested in knowing a little about me before you spend your hard earned money. Actually, my bio is pretty boring. I graduated with a degree in violin performance. While in school, I received a college scholarship and a university grant. I won a couple violin competitions - just regional stuff. After college, I was hired to play in recording studios. I was appointed concertmaster of a couple now defunct orchestras. I was hired to be the conductor of a now defunct chamber orchestra. I never won a position in a major symphony but over the years I have continued to work on my craft and improve my playing. Rather, I would like to share with you an experience I had recently. Please read below. Last night, my wife and I went to hear Leon Leyson speak at the Huntington Beach Library. He is a Holocaust survivor and was also in real life on Schindler's List. When Schindler's List the movie came out, he was interviewed by the newspapers and a couple months ago, he was spotlighted on TV in a 30 minute special entitled, "A Child on Schindler's List". Years ago, when my wife saw him in the newspapers, she said, "Hey this is Danny's father." A long time ago I had a very good violin student named Danny Leyson, who studied with me during his junior high and high school years. Anyway, the Library Theatre was packed and the library made provisions to accommodate the audience in overflow rooms with a live video feed. Mr. Leyson talked about the Nazi invasion of Poland. At that time, he was just a boy 10 years old. He said slowly the Nazis took away the rights of Jews. A rule went out that Jews were not allowed to sit on park benches. Then a little later, Jews were not allowed to even go to the park. Jews were not allowed to attend school. Businesses owned by Jews were confiscated. Businesses owned by non-Jews were also confiscated. The Nazis were not shy about taking anything that they wanted. Mr. Leyson said that the movie Schindler's List was accurate. A section of the city was designated the ghetto. Christians were forced to move out and Jews were forced to move in. In the ghetto, Jews were packed into that space. Multiple families shared 1 room. There was a fence built around the ghetto and guards placed in strategic locations. Mr. Leyson said that while there, he was always hungry and afraid. In the Nazi ideology, Jews were not considered human. Nazis murdered Jews at will, often turning it into sport. There was no way to develop a survival strategy. Daily events seemed random. A Nazi could shoot you for no reason at all. Mr. Leyson recounted story after story about how he was scheduled for extermination but somehow he was released. When the Nazis were vacating the ghetto, his friends went into hiding but he stepped forward, trying join his mother's group. Amazingly, the guard allowed him to join his mother. The boys that went into hiding were hunted down and killed. Mr. Leyson said that Oscar Schindler was one of many Germans who relocated to Poland to seek financial fortune. But Oscar Schindler was different. He cared about people. He spent his fortune saving Jews. When young Leyson looked into the eyes of the Nazis, he said that there was no humanity there. The Nazi mindset had clouded any human compassion. Oscar Schindler had compassion in large amounts. He would routinely walk the factory and talk to the workers. Schindler found it amusing that such a small boy could stand on a wooden crate and run such a big machine. Near the end of the war as Nazi Germany was losing, other factory owners closed the factories, took the money and fled. Instead, Oscar Schindler bribed officials and got permission to move the factory to Czechoslovakia, a safer place for his workers than Poland. Mr. Leyson spoke about being a Jew. He said that he has paid such a high price for being a Jew that he might as well continue to be one. He said that once, they were jammed into a box car and that the train had travelled all night. When morning came, they could see a glimmer of light though the cracks in the box car walls. The men shuffled to one side of the box car and started to say their morning prayers. Mr. Leyson said that he was surprised that the men knew which direction was east. On hindsight, he believes that the men did not know either. In a lighthearted way, Mr. Leyson said that God forgives them for not praying to the east. He said also that everyone in the factory worked daily 12 hour shifts. On the Sabbath, they were also required to work, but they kept the Sabbath in their hearts. I was so surprised to hear this, but I guess I shouldn't have. In my narrow view, only true born again believers were concerned about the attitude of their hearts. In the New Testament, the Apostle Paul tells us to circumcise our hearts, but in the Old Testament Moses says in Deuteronomy 10:16 "Circumcise therefore the foreskin of your heart, and be no more stiffnecked." After the war, many Germans would tell the Jews, "We didn't know." That became the common excuse. Mr. Leyson does not hold any animosity toward the German people. He said there were many varying degrees of participation and acceptance of the Nazi ideology among the Germans. After the war, young Leyson took engineering lessons from a former Nazi. The wife of the former Nazi started to say, "We didn't know." but her husband stopped her and said, "Don't use that excuse. Yes we knew." He was a father of 5 and would not have been allowed to work if he hadn't joined the Nazi party. Mr. Leyson commented, "After an experience like that, you have a choice - to be bitter or to go on with your life." He said that if you're bitter, you're only continuing to hurt yourself. He said that he does not "sweat the little stuff". If there's one thing I remember about him during the time that I taught his son, it was the he never seemed to be bothered by anything. You could count on him to be the nicest good natured guy. After the talk, there was a long line of people waiting to talk to Mr. Leyson, shake his hand, and give him a hug. He was so kind and attentive to each person. A young boy told him, "I'm Catholic." Mr. Leyson said, "That's okay. The first Catholics were Jews." I approached him after the talk. I told him that I loved his story. I also said that I understand that his son used to take violin lessons. I gave him 2 of my CDs and asked him if he knew the violinist on the cover. He did remember me. He told me that he loved taking his son to my house of violin lessons. He said he loved hearing us work on pieces and seeing my mother work in the kitchen. He said that that was a very good time in his life. We know from history that after the war, Nazis were tried for war crimes. Their defense was that they were ordered to do it. They said that they were innocent of inhuman acts, they were only following orders. How does the prosecution argue against that defense? At the conclusion of the trial, they were found guilty. The reasoning was that there is a high authority and a higher moral code that superseded the orders of the Nazi commanders. I wonder, if that trial were to take place today, would they have been found guilty? The world seems to be going down a path of denying God and denying our creator. Although DNA has refuted Darwinian Evolution, the world still seems intent on pushing this "random chance" - "mutation" philosophy. Is that so bad? What are the ramifications of the Darwinian Evolution "theory"? "No God" implies that humans have no one that we're responsible to. If you are absolutely supremely your own boss, you have no one you need to answer to. You can do anything you like. If we are the result of random chance, then human life is not valuable. If God did not create you intentionally as a person to fellowship with Him, then are you any different than the animals, the plants or the insects? How many of you have sprayed bug killer on ants? God has shown His love for me through His word and through His actions. I can hardly wait until I see Him face to face When the Messiah comes, the Jews will say, "There He is, the Messiah." I will have to agree. The Jews will say, "He is the Lion of Judah and can save us from our sins." Again I will have to agree, but I will say, this is the second time He has come.