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Babies Don't Have Hands
  • Artist: Go Ahead &
  • Label: CD Baby
  • UPC: 859700686386
  • Item #: SRD068638
  • Genre: Rock
  • Release Date: 6/10/2008
  • This product is a special order
  • Rank: 1000000000
CD 
List Price: $12.98
Price: $11.05
You Save: $1.93 (15%)

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Description

Babies Don't Have Hands on CD

The Go Ahead And is a band that makes funny songs. The songs on this CD are seriously not-serious. For eight years, songwriter/producer Joel Abbott was the musical improviser for the improv comedy theater Dad's Garage in Atlanta, Georgia. In that role, he played thousands of improv comedy shows, scoring scenes, and providing musical accompaniment to improvised songs, operas, and ballets. This album, 'Babies Don't Have Hands' is Joel Abbott's first solo effort. With a freewheeling sense of humor, wacky lyrics, and memorable melodies, this CD delivers a mix of ridiculousness that, as Joel says, 'will make your mom go, 'uh, what IS that?'' Most of the songs make fun of something or other. 'He Keeps the Tags On All His Clothes' makes fun of young people who try to gain status by making their clothes look like they were just bought. 'Band Name' makes fun of kids who can't think up a name for their band. 'Working Hard To Be A Hipster' makes fun of how hard hipsters work to look so distant and nonplussed. 'Boring People' makes fun of people who sit around watching too much television. 'You Bought This Song For A Dollar' makes fun of iTunes and how online distribution has de-valued music. The songs on this album are not serious, although sometimes they pretend to be. 'Nerf' is a serious depressing break-up song, and even though the singer tried so hard to save the relationship it becomes increasingly obvious why she broke up with him. 'Parade Kid' tells the scary story of a guy on a parade float being stalked by kid. In 'Mortal Enemy' a James Bond-like character sings to a James Bond-style villain. And for all the science fiction / Star Wars fans, 'TK-421, Why Aren't You At Your Post' tells of the forbidden love between an Imperial Officer and an absent Stormtrooper.