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Better Get Used to It
  • Artist: For Real for Real
  • Label: CD Baby
  • UPC: 634479444593
  • Item #: SRD944459
  • Genre: Rock
  • Release Date: 12/19/2006
  • This product is a special order
  • Rank: 1000000000
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Better Get Used to It on CD

"Hey! Com'ere for a sec'. When you guys got up there I was like 'Yeah, whatever, let me get that girl another beer,' but man, where in the hell did that come from? That was amazing! What's your band's name again?" New York bartenders don't lie about stuff like this. For Real for Real. For Real for Real's sonic fist grabs you by the nape of the neck and forces you to listen to it's yammering plea. "Tell me what you want me to do! Tell me what you want me to do!" they chant and pound, just like you did when that loser was about to leave you. City life shows them daily that those seemingly ordinary feelings are really do-or-die emotions. So they've decided to unleash this intensity as a vanquishing whirlwind of psych-punk that won't let you forget that "it's the little things that rule the world." THE LINE UP Guitarist Danny Damage promises that if everyone would just stay out of his way, no one will get hurt. In previous incarnations he did soundtrack work for Roger Corman (Caged Heat 3000) and played in The Trillion Stars, Sur Drone, psych groups such as Cyan and the notorious Pay the Man. Lately he likes opening shows by saying things like "Welcome to my house." The territorial type, you might say. T. likes sweaty drums. Pushing across the South, in bands such as Flounders Without Eyes and House of Usher, he sat his bare ass down in New York with The Chimps. Not content to just play along, T. strikes until sound or silence fills every space. "It keeps me sane." -- T. D. Cruz is trained as a classical guitarist. It's more obvious, however, that what he really likes is playing his bass till his fingers literally bleed. He worked the Northeast in the brit-pop outfit The New Years and the experimental United Star Power. But in For Real for Real, Cruz commits to rumbling a sonorous underline and proving that eye makeup can be brawny. Last year Vee Free literally burned five years of poetry to open herself up to writing performance- oriented lyrics. Rather than relying on the audience's ability to decipher cryptic meanings, her sardonic and impassioned songs have become nearly as effective at carrying her message as have her long supple legs. That was late 2005. By the middle of 2006, the emotional whirlwind blew the band apart. That raw emotion was captured in the studio by NYC Producer, Jamey Staub (Everlast, Pete Rock, Blues Explosion) in his midtown studio, Empire VU. The band's performance was recorded to 2' tape on a Studer tape machine. In fact, the very same machine used by Public Enemy and Sonic Youth at Greene Street Recording in the 80's. The album was mixed by Staub at Manhattan Center Studios to another Studer tape machine, and the levels were screaming hot. Mastered by Dave Kutch at Sony studios, this is the real deal. The end result is an aural assault by a wall of sound that begs to be heard. There is a rumour that Danny and Vanessa made a second album of accoustic material that is lost somewhere in New York City. If there is enough interest, maybe Perimeter Records will search, find and put out the last music these two poor emotional wrecks ever wrote together.