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You Never Get What You Want
  • Artist: Eric Geyer
  • Label: CD Baby
  • UPC: 884502831818
  • Item #: SRD283181
  • Genre: Rock
  • Release Date: 7/6/1999
  • This product is a special order
  • Rank: 1000000000
CD 
List Price: $15.98
Price: $13.75
You Save: $2.23 (14%)

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Description

You Never Get What You Want on CD

Following the success of his first CD, Make It Hum, Geyer returns with You Never Get What You Want, a 12-song train wreck between pop hooks and twang-laden rock. The new record is a more emotionally diverse record than previous releases, mixing powerful anthemic pop like 'Pretty Little Marathon' and 'Follow Me Down' with more moodier shuffles like 'Astrology Says' and 'Big Enough Heart'. Also, Geyer has made room this time out for a few of his more humorous tunes, including 'Sensitive Guy', a sarcastic ode to the evolved 90's man, a love song called 'I Hate You', and 'Radio Friendly', a crass slam at current popular music standards. Geyer offers some insight as to the inspiration for the new batch of songs: 'I'd have to say they're pretty personal this time out. Whereas before I may have been a little detached in some of my songwriting, I think these hit a little closer to what I was going through when I wrote them. Most of these songs are about relationship fallout of one kind or another. There's a definite cynical theme running through the whole record. There's really no way to ignore it, at least, from my perspective. But cynicism has always been a big issue for me and I guess songs are good way for me to try to work through that and make sense of it. Hasn't worked yet, but what the hell! (laughs) But when an audience identifies with something like that, when they laugh or they get into a song on some level, that's a very comforting experience. That to me is the whole point of writing.'