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E.T. Doolin
  • Artist: E.T. Doolin
  • Label: CD Baby
  • UPC: 634479819322
  • Item #: SRD981932
  • Genre: Rock
  • Release Date: 2/17/2004
  • This product is a special order
  • Rank: 1000000000
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List Price: $13.98
Price: $12.43
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E.T. Doolin on CD

Richie Unterberger, 'All Music Guide', USA: 'E.T. Doolin's self-titled debut is a modest but highly likable effort by a pleasing singer/songwriter who takes much of his inspiration (particularly melodically) from the early British Invasion. Specifically, many of the chord changes recall those of the early Beatles and Merseybeat, though there's a more confessional, personal tone to his lyrics than you'd hear in songs by Gerry & the Pacemakers and the like. In a significantly different mode, he also approximates the rockabilly of Creedence Clearwater Revival on 'Traveler,' and a Chuck Berry-influenced brand of power pop on 'Come On, Hannah.' It's the British Invasion-like love songs on which he shines brightest, though, with production that - unlike many post-'70s recordings with such heavy nods to the past - doesn't try too hard to pack on oomph. The full but tasteful sound is especially impressive given that everything was played by just two musicians, Doolin and Amit Poznansky. His slightly high and reedy voice will appeal to fans of Paul McCartney, Eric Carmen, and Badfinger, and while most of his compositions are good-hearted love odes, the melancholy 'Down, Down' hints at more serious singer/songwriter ambitions.' Mike Bennett, 'Fufkin', USA: 'A mid-fi recording steeped in traditional 50's and early 60's rock. Doolin's music comes from the same place as greats like Buddy Holly, Gene Pitney and Roy Orbison, and more modern artists like Chris Isaak, Billy Swan, Marshall Crenshaw and Billy Burnette. Doolin has a terrific voice -- he's not a powerhouse, but his vocals are well suited for the terrific trad songs he has whipped up. One song shows that he can equal those names. 'Dreaming' is a moody ballad somewhere between Isaak and The Everly Brothers, which moves from harmony inflected verses to a crooning chorus that builds beautifully, to a melody that rises and rises with a heartbreaking drop at the end. It is simply a great song. He is also good at the mid-tempo rock and roll shuffle, as shown by 'Why Do You Remind Me of Someone?' Again, Doolin sticks to the demands of the genre, but he does it so well, both in terms of the song (great middle eight, by the way) and his performance. His voice is perfect for playing the hurt guy and his guitar playing is clean and sharp. He does a pretty good job of reminding me of Ricky Nelson on 'Traveler'. One of the things about rockabilly is that the best artists have a swing to them, showing that rock isn't just power chords; it can be a hip shake and a swagger. Doolin has all of that in spades. This is excellent, and I hope that Doolin finds an audience for music that still sounds great in the 21st Century.' Barry Davis, 'Jerusalem Post', Israel: 'ET Doolin's debut eponymous album is something of a breath of fresh air on the local music scene. Doolin was born in Rishon Lezion and spent his formative years here and in New York, and the grass roots American influence is evident throughout the 10-track CD. ET Doolin is also something of a blast from the past. While all the songs are homespun, Doolin draws on the spirit of the Fifties and early Sixties with a mix of rock 'n' roll, rockabilly, and American folk music. Doolin, who shares the instrumental work with longtime sidekick Amit Poznansky and is on vocal duty throughout, comes over as the real McCoy. Opening track 'I Don't Want What I Need,' for instance, sounds like something straight out of the Everly Brothers songbook, while the Johnny Cashesque-delivered 'Traveler' should get even the most committed couch potato's toe tapping with fervor. Doolin's debut offering is the work of a clear-headed artist and songwriter with a surprisingly wide stylistic and vocal range.' 'Ctrl. Alt. Country', Belgium: 'Israel is not exactly a fixed supplier when it comes to rootsy material. Therefore we were agreeably surprised by the quality of the songs on E.T. Doolin's debut album. At ten numbers long, he serves timeless Rock 'N' Roll with a very 60ish spirit and an obvious love of the Beatles. Songs such as the lazy 'Dreaming', the summery and lively 'I don't want what I need' and the delicious rocker 'Traveler' ideally showcase the unmistakable writer qualities of Doolin.' Goran Obradovic, 'Popism/Torpedo Records', Sweden: 'After RockFour and Shy Nobleman, here's another proof that some serious retro-pop thing is goin' on in Israel. Unlike the other two acts, whose recordings are kind of a kaleidoscopic soundscapes full of studio trickery, E.T. Doolin takes a more simplistic path, leaving the spotlight on the songs themselves. An artist that first comes to mind is his American soulmate, Eytan Mirsky, with an almost identical approach, mostly leaning on the musical legacy from the mid-'60s backwards, while Shy and the 'Four, having the same starting point, move towards the other direction... Being a self-release, a proper distribution under the guidance of some serious label, might take this towards an international pop audience, where it belongs.' 'Mohair Sweets', Canada: 'The cover of this CD simply does not prepare you for the classic sunshiny, songwriter pop of E.T. Doolin. I was ready for some sort of 'woe is me' or 'what is it all about' trip and then - blammo! - it's nothin' but great song craft and playing! Great stuff... A very nice surprise indeed!' Kevin Mathews, 'Fufkin', USA: 'I must admit that knowing that E.T. hailed from Israel did not prepare me for the strength of the material on view on this eponymous release. E.T. has cast his lot with the pop music of the late 50s and early 60s and (together with Amit Poznansky) does a bang-up job evoking the era of Buddy Holly, Roy Orbison, the Beatles, the Beach Boys, Chuck Berry, Elvis et al... be ready to be astonished.' Ariel Kras, 'Time Out Magazine', Israel: 'E.T. Doolin has been around for quite some time. You possibly may (not) have heard of him when he was a member of a progressive rock band called 'Lord Flimnap', which released it's only album some 15 years ago. At the time, the band members were still in high school and wrote complex, intricate prog-rock pieces. Doolin's present direction is much more simple and pop-oriented. His self titled album contains 10 bouncy, energetic pop-rock songs. He's an outstanding melodist and his rich and tasty harmonies are reminiscent of the Beach Boys and Roy Orbison among others.' Jon Worley, 'Aiding and Abetting', USA: 'Doolin is a sucker for those skiffly Beatles moments--the acoustic, harmony-laden songs that are probably best remembered as the majority of the soundtrack to A Hard Day's Night. Doolin's not stealing, though. He's simply got a nice feel for that late 50s rockabilly/folk/country stuff, and he updates it nicely for the kids today.' Phil Suggitt, 'Shindig!' Magazine, England: 'Apparently E T Doolin used to be in a heavy progressive band! Happily you would never guess from listening to this album, which is full of simple, melodic tunes. There is a straightforward, uncluttered feel to the backing, eschewing frills or studio gimmicks. The vocals are strong and figure prominently in the mix. There is a happy, good-time vibe throughout. Even on the mournful tunes ET doesn't sound if his heart has been broken forever.' 'Israblog', Israel: 'E.T. Doolin (31 years old), a Psychology master's degree student, released his first album at the end of 2003. His music sounds as if it came from a very far-away place in order to surround us with some much-needed tranquility. Doolin is immersed in American Folk-Rock and Country in such levels I haven't yet heard from any local artist and personally reminded me of Beck in his cheerful, acoustic version. Judging by 'Dreaming' and 'Jane', the two songs that I've heard, his forthcoming gigs are something worth waiting for.' 'Guitars Galore', Germany: '...E.T Doolin's first album developed in Israel between the spring and autumn of 2003. Amit Poznansky served as engineer besides playing drums and piano. Mister Doolin, who wrote all songs, plays guitar, bass, harmonica, piano and sings. Came out an amazingly professional, varied and really good album. Country, folk, Beatles-inspired pop. Everything is there. The album has quite it's own note, it's own flair...' 'Phase 9 Entertainment', England: 'Elvis might have left the building but Rock And Roll is still alive and kicking, thanks to artists such as E T Doolin who unreservedly embrace it... This album plays like a lost Beatles album from around 1964 / 1965...this is like The Beatles before the drugs kicked in...This is basically a bridge between good old-fashioned Rock And Roll and 1960's Beat music. It is hard to dislike what is basically a fun album.' 'Plug In Music', USA: 'E.T. Doolin rolls through classic rock 'n' roll style songs like a jukebox. Offering a country swagger one moment and a soft, intimate ballad style the next, Doolin's tracks are independent of one another but mostly cohesive together. Adding his unassuming style, Doolin's self-titled album does not feel outdated... Doolin's ready to sing through your stereo speakers at your next sock hop.' Who is E.T. Doolin? Well, as far as most people know, he was born on Dec. 7th 1972, exactly 26 years after his father was born and 23 years after Tom Waits. He grew up in the large metropolis of Rishon Le Zion, Israel and in the slightly larger metropolis of NY, New York. His first song was written at the age of 3. At the age of 10 he started studying classical guitar and at 14 he began playing bass guitar both in a jazz big band and in many of the local high school rock groups. He also taught himself the piano, harmonica and mandolin. In 1988 he formed the progressive rock trio 'Lord Flimnap' with Alon Waisman and Ohad Goldbart . Their album 'Point of view' was released in 1989 on the 'Third Ear' (now 'Earsay') label in Israel and on the German label 'SPM Records' and is now a sought-after album among progressive rock enthusiasts all over the world. E.T. has written over a hundred songs, ten of which are featured here, on his debut album.