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Flowers on the Dirt Road Home
  • Artist: Deepnine
  • Label: CD Baby
  • UPC: 659057787824
  • Item #: CDBY778782
  • Genre: Electronic
  • Release Date: 5/6/2003
  • This product is a special order
  • Rank: 1000000000
CD 
List Price: $7.98
Price: $6.81
You Save: $1.17 (15%)

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Description

Flowers on the Dirt Road Home on CD

Something mysteriously soothing and spiritual resides in Deepnine's debut album of new edge vocal electronica anti-pop. Among Deepnine's influences one can discern the electro-pop foundations and laid back vocal delivery of New Order and Pet Shop Boys, memorable melody and poetic lyrics a la Everything but the Girl and the dark, haunting, devotional sound of Dead Can Dance. Light a candle, turn off the lights and spend an evening with the haunting spirits that permeate Deepnine's new release 'Flowers on the Dirt Road Home' The CD features the internationally acclaimed singles 'Saigon' and 'This Fleeting World' as well as eight other catchy, atmospheric and sometimes haunting tunes. Deepnine seems to effortlessly bridge downtempo, dance, pop and new age genres. The first single 'Saigon' incorporates dark western electro-pop and traditional Vietnamese poetry singing with guest vocals from Huong Cao. 'Deepnine's unique signature sound has a power in it's laid back delivery; I'll give Deepnine a perfect ten.' John Gilbert Leavitt - Radio Stonewall --------BIO ----- Deepnine is musician, songwriter and producer Brent Roberts who was born and raised in the 'sleepy town' of Cincinnati, Ohio. His grandmother used to encourage him to make free-form ceramics in her large basement studio. She often suggested glazes, ways to hold the tools, and generally helped turn unhappy disasters into something unexpected. Then she would fire the pieces in her kiln. Sometimes she would enter his work in local competitions on his behalf. Brent thinks his first 'Honorable Mention' in pottery was the birth of the creative spirit that drives him to this day. Brent remembers getting his first 45 rpm record of Elton John's 'Sorry Seems to be the Hardest Word' around eight years of age. He was hooked. He acquired singles by Manfred Mann's Earth Band, James Taylor, K.C. and the Sunshine Band, The Commodores, The Eagles, Wings and even Barry Manilow. Brent began keeping journals full of song lyrics by the age of twelve. He fantasized about album covers and singing with his favorite stars. Brent learned to play the trumpet and joined the school band and chorus. Middle school brought with it an obsession with Blondie. High school a turn towards Prince, then the Smiths, Depeche Mode and all things 'New Wave'. Senior year was spent trying to get into the hot Ohio nightspots for dancing with friends, albeit unsuccessfully. The punk scene frequented by his best friend required no fake ID on the other hand. So Brent became a regular at the Jockey Club in Covington, KY. There he was exposed to bands like Suicidal Tendencies, Agnostic Front, Husker Du and many others. His musical affinities remained elsewhere but the experience and the punk aesthetic was unforgettable. Then Brent grew up, left home and went to the big city of Washington, DC to attend Georgetown University. He studied liberal arts and foreign affairs at the School of Foreign Service and fell in with a circle of adventurous friends. He majored in Humanities and French Culture but claimed to be minoring in 'Tracks', which was a local nightclub. His ears were filled with Pet Shop Boys, Alison Moyet, Malcolm McLaren, Eurythmics, Bronski Beat. At GU Brent discovered lesser known acts like The Blue Nile and Everything But the Girl and began to refine his musical taste. A college degree later and Brent found himself hawking books at the DC landmark Kramerbooks in Dupont Circle and working for next to nothing at the local 'Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company'. It was during this time that he met the friend who would change everything. Joe Rowe confided his lifelong musical aspirations to Brent one day and the two began to scheme and dream. A horrible first collaboration was later dubbed 'The Coconut Song'. The recording ends in gales of laughter. But a dream had re-awoken and Brent and Joe began a long period of collaboration which turned into the 90s synth-pop band Shivering Blondes. Brent was primarily the lyricist for Shivering Blondes but began learning the basics of music theory. Alas the Shivering Blondes claim to fame was not their success. The group, which later included Michael Arthur, spilt after Joe took off to pitch their demo in London where he lived as a Go-Go boy. London was not calling the 'Shivering Blondes' at that time. Brent bought a keyboard from his former bandmate Michael and spent several years delving into music theory books. His solo compositions, formerly light synth pop, turned more serious and introspective over time. He started a new band with his partner as lead vocalist called 'My Brother Judas'. He immersed himself in the music of Dead Can Dance, This Mortal Coil, Loreena McKennitt and Enya. The digital revolution allowed for better quality home recording. When My Brother Judas broke apart in the late 90s Brent decided it was time to sing and record his own music. He revisited some long forgotten compositions and began updating and recording them under a new name, Deepnine. Inspired by the results of these sessions new and exciting solo work poured out of him. Brent's thoughtful, well crafted debut album which was years in the making, will be released by Collabitat Records on April 30, 2003.