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Gorgeous Enormous
  • Artist: Carolyn AlRoy
  • Label: CD Baby
  • UPC: 837101105040
  • Item #: SRD110504
  • Genre: Rock
  • Release Date: 11/15/2005
  • This product is a special order
  • Rank: 1000000000
CD 
List Price: $18.98
Price: $16.14
You Save: $2.84 (15%)

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Description

Gorgeous Enormous on CD

Carolyn AlRoy grew up in Princeton, NJ, home of eclectic oddballs and intellectual misfits. She went to Rutgers to study acting, but ended up becoming a poet. She studied with Poet Laureate Robert Pinski, doing readings throughout the New York City area throughout the '90's until she began pursing her doctorate as a licensed psychotherapist and writing songs. 'The process of songwriting is similar to therapy,', according to AlRoy. 'When I hear patients use unusual language, it makes me stop and ask questions...the language holds something that is not directly expressed, but is tangible'. She has a private practice in Manhattan where she helps people with their inner demons during the day before showing off her own in New York clubs by night. GORGEOUS ENORMOUS is AlRoy's debut album, and is co-produced by singer-songwriter Matt Keating and indie rock producer Adam Lasus (Clap Your Hands And Say Yeah). The album is a breath of fresh air: familiar but completely original. The songs in GORGEOUS ENORMOUS are influenced by artists such as Crowded House and Matthew Sweet. AlRoy's music vacillates between upbeat power-pop numbers with jangly guitars and quietly lilting folk ballads. Featuring an all-star band including drums by Mark Brotter from HEM, bass by Jason Mercer (Ron Sexsmith, Ani DiFranco), and Matt Keating on almost everything else, AlRoy's songs alternately shine with exuberance and melancholy. From the spaghetti-Western influenced 'Reality Song' to the chamber pop extravaganza 'Valentines Day,' to the grungy 'Sound of Revolution,' AlRoy's engagingly exquisite voice traverses different genres seamlessly. Her cover of Helter Skelter ranks up there as one of the best Beatle covers ever with it's subversive take on that 60's classic. It is disturbingly slow and achingly tense; if Charles Manson had heard this one first, he would have never gotten around to killing anybody.