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Youth Electronics
  • Artist: The Carolines
  • Label: CD Baby
  • UPC: 670213246825
  • Item #: SRD324682
  • Genre: Rock
  • Release Date: 6/24/2003
  • This product is a special order
  • Rank: 1000000000
CD 
List Price: $12.98
Price: $11.28
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Description

Youth Electronics on CD

When describing the Carolines music as reminiscent of 1970's-era AM pop-rock radio, it's important to make clear what exactly that means. Mentioning that period can bring back frightening memories of Peaches and Herb or England Dan and John Ford Coley, but the Carolines musical identity is nowhere near that. More clearly, their musical roots are likened to 'Hey Jude'-era Beatles and Supertramp with touches of Steely Dan. However, like their contemporaries Fountains Of Wayne and Spoon, the Carolines aren't afraid to let the good times of youth roll again. The Carolines are a five-piece band based in Portland, Oregon, made up of brothers Aaron (lead vocals, piano) and Nathan Trueb (lead guitar), Nate Purscelley (guitars, trumpet, bgv), Matthew Lenhart (bass, bgv) and Jared Abraham (drums, bgv). Four of the five members have been together over six years now. In fact, two members were only 13 years old when the band began. With their second release, 'Youth Electronics,' The Carolines have crafted 10 sparkling tracks of summer-infused rock that would sound great even through your dad's old transistor radio. The band places a strong emphasis on creating intricate arrangements and harmonies and wrapping them around catchy choruses. 'Youth Electronics' kicks off with the delightful pop of 'Lonely Last Summer,' a perfect mood-setter for the CD. 'Columbo' would not sound out of place on Ben Folds' latest from the piano intro to the succinct, sing-along chorus. 'The Payoff,' with a horn arrangement Soul Train would groove on, is a melting pot that early Chicago would be proud of. Those yearning for some nice ballads reminiscent of The Carolines first release 'Don't Believe What You Hear' won't be disappointed when 'Blue And Black' and 'The Coast Is Clear' make feeling depressed feel so good. As they sing in 'Lonely Last Summer,' 'Infatuation is such a rush' and indeed, The Carolines are a great act to be infatuated with. Recent Press The album is loaded with catchy hooks, melodies and earnest-as-hell lyrics about love, unrequited and otherwise. Standard stuff, but so well done and often so clever that it's hard not to like. It's pop-rock 1970s style, with brains and feeling. -- the songwriting drives the album forward with a dogged persistence. Some of the songs contain moments of pure pop brilliance, making the whole thing worth anyone's time, The Daily Emerald (The Carolines) have made one of the most impressive albums that critics (like yours truly) have heard. It's a blend of pure pop, with enough of a rock edge to never be too sweet. Baroque pop meets Seventies rock? The Carolines should be--and are going to be--hailed for creating such a blend. They sound great, and have made one of the best summertime records since I don't know when. The Carolines have easily usurped the throne for 'album of the year.' Joseph Kyle-Mundane Sounds It's obvious the band has been working at pop song craft-choruses soar with inspired singing and guitars mingle with playful piano. The Oregonian.